Agile is dead? What’s next?

When I first saw these words written on Twitter I thought, “No way, Agile can’t be dead. There is too much money invested. Too many groups, conferences, books, and tools to be sold.” Turns out, I was right. People weren’t saying that “Agile” is dead, but that the term has been diluted so much as to be meaningless.

I have been thinking about that idea for some time, I actually thought that “Lean” bit the dust long before “Agile” did. Lean was dead as a meaningful term once “Lean startups” started to spring up. So do I really care that “Agile” as a term referring to the Agile Manifesto is dead? Not really.

So what next? Does the over-abundance of money-changers in the Agile temple mean that we give up on Scrum? Lean? Kanban? That we don’t value “Individuals and interactions over processes and tools”? No, we can continue to use these tools if they provide value. I hope that this discussion around the word “Agile” causes teams and individuals to reflect and evaluate what kind of return they are getting based on where most of their energy is spent. I’ve found that most Agile tools are centered around providing feedback and reports to managers (Who, in the Chicken & Pigs store are often Chickens. Often they are just farmhands to really bury the metaphor).

“Why do we need to point all of our stories in Super Frumpy Agile Tool 2.3?”
“So we can measure your velocity.”
“Why do we need to measure our velocity?”
“So we can estimate how long it will take you do finish”
“But velocity doesn’t really tell you when we will finish, only how many points we can get done, on average, in a sprint?”
“blurrggghhhh bar charts!”