Herding Code 235: Matthew Renze on Data Science for Software Developers

Download / Listen: Herding Code 235: Matthew Renze on Data Science for Software Developers

At DevSum Stockholm, Jon talks to Matthew Renze (@matthewrenze ) about data science practices to improve both the products they are creating and their software development practices.

Topics:

  • (00:20) Matthew explains how he’s been speaking to software developers about applying data science practices to improve both the products they are creating and their software development practices.
  • (00:40) Data science can add intelligence to applications, machine learning to automate decision-making processes, and deep learning to modify the user interface using anticipatory design.
  • (03:57) The other side to this is using data science to help build software. The DevOps pipeline provides a lot of objective measures to help improve our software development processes and practices.
  • (05:51) Software telemetry data can help us prioritize the time we spend on features towards those that are actively used.
  • (07:12) Jon asks which terms he really needs to understand as a developer. Matthew defines data science, machine learning, deep learning, and reinforcement learning. They discuss how text suggestions and language understanding have progressed, and where generated text can and can’t help.
  • (13:55) Machine learning can be used for good and for evil – for instance, it’s now possible to forge video in a way that’s really tough to detect. What do we do now? Matthew talks about what we can do as developers to educate those around us and apply ethics to the software we contribute to.
  • (19:50) How do we handle things like legal liability for machines that are making decisions, like self-driving cars? Matthew puts it in historical context and talks about how we’ll need to adapt our society to accommodate.
  • (24:12) Jon asks where to get started applying data science today. Matthew gives some pointers on where to get started learning, and how to start with some quick wins like A/B testing and objective software quality metrics.

Herding Code 234: Dylan Beattie on Social Impacts of Technology and the Meaning of Developer Seniority

Download / Listen: Herding Code 234: Dylan Beattie on Social Impacts of Technology and the Meaning of Developer Seniority

At DevSum Stockholm, Jon talks to Dylan Beattie (@dylanbeattie ) about the impacts our technology choices have on our world, different kinds of seniority for software developers, and how to get started as a conference speaker.

Topics:

  • (01:00) Dylan explains how he juggles writing and delivering several keynote presentations (and a bit about the Rockstar programming language). He talks about writing a presentation as an essay first, rather than starting with slides.
  • (06:52) Jon asks Dylan about the themes he’s hoping to bring up in his presentations. Dylan talks about the difference between the things we’re building software to do versus the actual important things we should be focusing on as humans. What is the cost of chasing the new and shiny things, and why can’t we be satisfied with the technology we have?
  • (13:10) Jon asks Dylan about how to convince people to act in the long term interests of humanity. Dylan talks about YouTube’s perfect user is someone who watches movies nonstop for the rest of their life. Jon and Dylan discuss the effectiveness and difficulties of legislating technology.
  • (17:05) So what can we do? Dylan says a good place is to explain things just one level deeper to our non-technical friends. And… heresy alert… you don’t have to build software on the absolute newest technology, either. Jon and Dylan talk about how many of our modern application experiences are inferior to basic HTML.
  • (21:50) Jon asks how developers should advance their careers. Do we need to become managers? Dylan discusses the concept of a “senior developer” and describes four strands: management, leadership, expertise, and mentoring.
  • (24:55) Dylan talks about the example of how Linus Torvalds reacted when confronted over hostility on Linux mailing lists. One important thing is that Linus didn’t put the responsibility of telling him how to fix his behavior on those who confronted him over it.
  • (27:15) Jon asks Dylan how we can apply this to our careers. Dylan discusses the tradeoff – growing in one area will likely cause others to suffer. He explains how to progress in each of these areas, and explains how impactful mentorship doesn’t need to be a big time commitment.
  • (31:00) Jon asks for advice for developers who are interested in getting started with public speaking.

Herding Code 233: Dino Esposito on Blazor, ASP.NET Core, Writing Technical Books, and Machine Learning

Download / Listen: Herding Code 233: Dino Esposito on Blazor, ASP.NET Core, Writing Technical Books, and Machine Learning

Jon talks to Dino Esposito at dotNext (Saint Petersburg, Russia) about Blazor, ASP.NET Core, Writing Technical Books, and Machine Learning.

Topics:

  • (00:45) Blazor
  • (16:50) ASP.NET Core, the ASP.NET Core pipeline and proliferation of available endpoints
  • (27:45: Writing technical books
  • (30:05) Machine Learning and ML.NET

Herding Code 232: Scott Koon on getting out of Tech, GitHub Package Registry, Build 2019 Recap

Download / Listen: Herding Code 232: Scott Koon on getting out of Tech, GitHub Package Registry, Build 2019 Recap

Kevin, Scott K, and Jon talk about Scott Koon’s bold adventure out of the tech industry, GitHub Package Registry, and a Build 2019 Recap.

Herding Code 231: .NET Foundation Elections, WSL, MAX_PATH, calc.exe, Edge on Chromium, Firefox, and Rogue Thermostats

Download / Listen: Herding Code 231: .NET Foundation Elections, WSL, MAX_PATH, calc.exe, Edge on Chromium, Firefox, and Rogue Thermostats

Kevin, K Scott, and Jon talk about .NET Foundation Elections, WSL, MAX_PATH, calc.exe, Edge on Chromium, Firefox, and Rogue Thermostats.

Some links:

Herding Code 230: 2018 Year End Wrapup

Download / Listen: Herding Code 230: 2018 Year End Wrapup

Kevin, K Scott, Jon, and Rob Conery talked about what they’ve been learning, programming languages vs. async patterns, message queues, blockchain, Claude Shannon, Mandarin, learning to play the drums, making perfect lattes, and more.

In the interest of getting this out there, this one going up the same day it was recorded, without detailed notes. Maybe we’ll update the notes, maybe we won’t.

Enjoy!